Join the 21-Day Equity Challenge

Posted on October 6, 2020

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When I received the email invitation from NAACP to join the 21-Day Equity Challenge, organized by Lenawee & Monroe Counties’ United Way, I didn’t hesitate to participate. I am thrilled at the idea that I am a part of a group of folks who are working to increase equity in our community.

In an interview with Toledo’s Channel 13 Action News, United Way Associate Director Laura Pipis said, “I think it’s important for all of us to learn how to get along, see each other and to get more empathy about everybody’s experience. It isn’t the same. How we can learn more about ourselves and our fellow humans?”

Each day an email is sent to your inbox with resources and tools to build racial equity.

We believe in a community free of discrimination and free of harassment. We’re hoping that if nothing else, you take away one thing from this,” United Way of Monroe/Lenawee Counties Executive Director Connie Carroll said. That one thing could be a new perspective, a new person to admire, or a better understanding of someone’s life that’s not your own. Think of it this way. For just 21 days, instead of scrolling through a social media feed for 10-20 minutes, you could learn something new for 10-20 minutes.


Is this the first you’ve learned of the 21-Day Equity Challenge? No worries! You haven’t missed it! You can join any time, and I hope you will.

Sign up now at United Way 21-Day Equity Challenge & let me know if you do sign on to participate. Citizen Teacher Readers Unite!

If you’ve already been practicing Everyday Antiracism with me, the 21-Day Challenge adds more layers and will alert you to new opportunities. If you haven’t been taking at least ONE antiracist action every day, the 21-Day Challenge can help you get started in creating a habit of advocating for equity in your daily life, at home, at work, and in the community.

Sign up now at United Way 21-Day Equity Challenge & let me know if you do sign on to participate. Citizen Teacher Readers Unite!


Let us be fierce like Adrian’s most-famous advocate for abolition, education, and equity, Laura Smith-Haviland, who said, “Man, I fear neither your weapons nor your threats; they are powerless” (When she was threatened at gunpoint by slave catchers, in A Woman’s Life Work, 1881, p. 76).

There’s work to be done. Let’s get busy.


lisa eddy is a writer-for-hire, researcher, educator-for-hire, youth advocate,  musician, and gardener.

On Twitter: @lisa_eddy


On email: lisagay.eddy1@gmail.com